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The Building
The Building
Carriage House Center for the Arts offers an enduring legacy of architectural beauty in the heart of Manhattan. The Dutch Renaissance Revival building stands as a distinctive landmark in the city with a breathtaking modern interior that is both functional and beautiful. The 2-1/2 story Dutch Revival Style alludes to New York City’s history as the Dutch colony of New Amsterdam. Its configuration is typical of private stables of the era with space for The carriage and horses on the ground floor and living quarters for the coachmen above. Bold ornamentation and a strong roofline distinguish this building from others around it.
Supporting Programs
Supporting Programs
The Gabarron Foundation - a non profit foundation - is a true believer of non profit organizations and its programs, events and activities. The Foundation collaborates and contributes to other non profit organizations by making a special deduction of the rental fee for hosting a program at The Carriage House. In addition, the Gabarron Foundation will arrange a special supporting program for organizing multi events at The Carriage House.
Special Features
Special Features
The Carriage House is equipped with state of the art audio visual equipment that is integrated on the first and second floor. Additional features include video conferences, wireless microphones, DVD/CD players, high speed internet connection, and iPod connection.
Collaborate
Collaborate
Collaboration is a basic component of the Gabarron Foundation. The Foundation welcomes and encourages other institutions to collaborate with our goals. The Gabarron Foundation is always open to new cultural programs.
NYC Landmark
NYC Landmark
For a library reference, you can read more about The Carriage House in the following publications: Guide to New York City Landmarks, One Thousand New York Buildings and The Landmarks of New York.
Pricing and Booking
Pricing and Booking
Get inspired and book your next event at The Carriage House! For pricing and booking information, please contact at 212.573.6968 or email infoGF@gabarron.org
 
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Carriage House Center

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The Carriage House was built in 1902 and is one of New York City’s landmarks. It was designed by architect Ralph S. Townsend as a private stable. It was later owned by George S. Bowdoin, a partner at J. P. Morgan. The 2 ½ story Dutch Renaissance Style Revival building has an elegant traditional carriage house exterior and a modern loft-like interior with high quality finishes...

Until the earliest 20th century, horse drawn vehicles were the primary mode of transportation in New York City, and horses were a vital part of city life. This structure was built in 1902 during the last phase of stable construction in the city for William H. Martin, a real estate developer and senior partner in the clothing firm Rogers, Peet & Company. The stable was purchased in 1907 by George S. Bowdoin, a partner of J.P. Morgan and Company, who lived at Park Avenue and East 36th Street.

The 2 ½ story Dutch Revival style alludes to New York City as the Dutch colony of New Amsterdam. Its configuration is typical of private stables of the era, with space for the carriage and horses on the ground floor and living quarter for  the coachmen above.

 

Bold ornamentation and a strong roofline distinguish this building from others around it. Each of the three arched entries is defined by over scaled stone quoins and voussoir. Sculpted stone horse heads accentuate each end of the narrow spandrel above and in the center is a shield inscribed with the address number “149.” Between the two small windows on the second story is a large stone panel with a shield with the date “A.D. 1902.”

An elaborate stepped gable arises from a mansard roof with stone quoins, marking each vertical edge of the gable, and a stone volute capping each step. A semi circular stone pediment tops the sculpture. In the center of the gables is an oval window, with an ornate stone surround, above which sits a carved bulldog’s head.

In 1918, Edith Bowdoin inherited the stable from her father and converted it into a garage. She owned it until 1944; since then various owners have reconfigured the upper floors. In 1982 architect and engineer Cy Mills designed a modern loft interior to be used as a gallery.